The Next Meeting

  

Looking Ahead
Apr 24, 2014
Perspectives on GMO's
May 01, 2014
Greeley Water; Past, Present, Future
May 08, 2014
Trailblazer Foundation; 10 Years in Cambodia
May 15, 2014
Lawn Care and Gardening
May 22, 2014
Agfinity CEO
May 29, 2014
Nationally Known Energy Analyst **(Invite friends in the energy business)
Jun 05, 2014
Centennial Rotary Exchange Student From Callian France
View entire list...
Club Events
25th Annual Golf Tournament May 09, 2014
Mini Calendar
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Stories
Posted by Loren Wright

Our very own Ted Gilliland shared experiences and photos from the Honduras/Guatemala trip that Centennial Rotarians took last fall. The group consisted of 11 people who spent a total of 9 days split between the two countries. The trip seemed to be nothing short of a "Rotary Moment"

While in Guatemala the group met up with some representatives from Starfish One by One which is a group that encourages the empowerment of Mayan women in the region. In general they found that Mayan women are shy and timid due to their culture. The primary goal of Starfish is to help these girls breakthrough those boundaries to become leaders in their community and culture. During the visit our group was able to participate in team building exercises with some of the girls in the program to see a small process that these women go through in the program. The Rotary group split up and did family visits with two families who had daughters going through the program. The daughter of one family was right at the the completion of the program and was preparing herself to go to University to study business. The daughter from the other family had just begun her journey in the Starfish program. Part of the Rotary Global Grant was allocated to provide a new Starfish office with new appliances and Toshiba laptops which the Rotarians actually purchased during the trip.

During the other half of the trip the group traveled to Honduras to see the progress on the Union Cedral school that Centennial Rotary helped furnish with desks and schools supplies. This project was completed through a partnership with Simple Suppers for Kids. The Centennial Rotarians were able to see how the money was spent and interact with the children we were able to help through this meaningful project.  

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Posted by Loren Wright

The Greeley West Interact club joined our meeting to give us an update on what they have accomplished over the past year. Some of the highlights from the past year include their annual Trick or Treat Street where they provide a fun and safe environment at the school on Halloween for kids to come and play games as well as trick or treat. One of the largest fundraisers that the Greeley West Interact produces every year is Thanksgiving Big Give. This year the group gave more than $2900 worth of food to families in need. Interact was donated more food than anticipated resulting in a surplus of nearly 1300 boxes so they were able to donate boxes of food to on duty fire fighters and public safety members.

With the floods during 2013 Interact also supported a flood relief food drive and was able to help support our local food banks during their highest time of need. Along with all of these wonderful activities that Interact participates in every year they still find time to help sell our "Golf Ball Drop" tickets and for that we thank them.

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Posted by Loren Wright

The Greeley West student of the month for February is Maci Herman. Maci is an artist and she also is a dancer in the Greeley West POMS club. Even though Maci is extremely talented with her art she is also very mathematic and scientific in her way of thinking. 

Maci was given the opportunity to nominate the teacher of the month and she chose Peggy Freemole who teaches theatre at Greeley West and she is also the POMS coach.

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Posted by Kacie Vaughn

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Steve Reams with the Weld County Sheriff's office was recognized and presented with the Service Above Self Award for the month of February.  Steve oversees patrol, animal control and the SWAT team.  Steve was described as a man of great integrity and character, a leader and very experienced in his field.  He was also in charge of organizing the Sam Brownlee memorial.  Congratulations to Steve and a huge thank you from Centennial Rotary for his dedication and passion for our community.
Posted by Kacie Vaughn

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The Greeley West Student of the Month is Junior, Violette Marcantonio and the Teacher of the Month is Brandon Torrez who teaches statistics at Greeley West.

Posted by Kacie Vaughn

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Veronica Martinez was the Dugan Scholar of the Month.  Veronica is a senior at Dayspring Christian School.  She is involved in the worship team, cheer-leading and volleyball.  She has been on 3 mission trips and is planning a trip to Jamaica in March with her senior class.  She leads a friend to friend group at Dayspring, has a love for art and theater, as well as global community service.  She hasn't finalized her college plans as of yet, but knows she wants to be an art teacher.

Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

President Will Hume announced to the clubthat a non-profit arm of Pirate Radio will assume the maintenance of the motorhome generously donated by a family in Fort Collins following Dr. SanJuanaMendoza's radio interview. The people Dr. Mendoza targets literally survive on scraps fromthe dump and monies raised salvaging reusable items to sell. These people are thepoorest of Juarez Mexico. Dr. Mendoza serves the medical needs of these people atlow or no cost to them. Our club has supported her work to these people on aninternational humanitarian basis and making our effort to "Engage Rotary and Change Lives."

The motor home will be used as part ofa traveling radio program from Greeley, Colorado to El Paso, Texas. El Paso isjust across the Mexican Border from Juarez. Along the route the motor home willbe filled with medical supplies and donations for the medical mission. Thehope is that other Rotary Clubs along the way will be inspired to contributewhatever supplies they can and partner with us in this work. Thank you to thepeople of Pirate Radio and their non-profit and the many Rotarians who havebrought this development into existence. An a special "Thank you" to Will Humefor his tireless spearheading of this project.

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Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

Dick Monfort was a graduate of Greeley West High School,a 1976 graduate of University of Northern Colorado in Business, and comes from a Greeley family that has helped mold the great community we live in. The philanthropic nature of the Monfort family has helped mold Greeley and all of NorthernColorado to be the places they are today. Their is a good chance that Colorado would not have major league baseball if it weren't for the efforts of Dick and his family.
For the last 17 years Dick has workedwith the Rockies organization and he shared some of the difficulties andchallenges of being a young team in a small market. He also shared his dream tomake baseball available to as many people as possible. Tickets are still $4 foradults and $2 for children and seniors for seats in an area referred toas the Rock Pile. Coors Field ranks as one of the best stadiums in Major LeagueBaseball. The company has spent more that One hundred million dollars upgradingit to improve the fan experience. The organization has also spent more moneythan other teams to develop young players and add depth and sustainability tothe team as a whole. The Colorado Rockies were recently named minor league organization of theyear for their farm team program.

Dick spoke with excitement and enthusiasmabout the team's growth and development. A 20 year old team is a real youngsterin this very competitive business. Rockies revenues are dwarfed by thoseteams like the Dodgers and Yankees that have been around "forever". His hope isto stay focused on the long haul and on the quality of the players and of theorganization and let history decide the rest.

It was clear that his goal was to makethe Rockies a good team, a good business and a good citizen ofColorado. His energy and enthusiasm werecaptivating whether you were a baseball fan or not. Best of luck to the Rockies, Dick Monfort, and his dreams

 

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Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

Christy Hardwick has been a FraudInvestigation Specialist with the Greeley Police Department since 1999. Thereare many ways that crooks try to make their own Christmas merrier at yourexpense. She warned us to be careful when shopping online. If you click on alink to order something, be sure that the site it takes you to belongs to thecompany your are working with by comparing the URL address. Also lookfor the padlock symbol or https when going to pay. The 's"at the end of http_stands for secure site. Your data will be encrypted as it travels throughcyberspace to get to your supplier which makes it safer.

Sometimes crooks send a notice thatthey have a package they need to deliver, but need more information before theycan do it. These criminals are just "phishing" for more personal information so they cansteal your identity later. Beware of free travel offers. Such offers provide criminals an opportunity to get your personal identification. Be sure to travel with only reputablesources.  E-card invitations are very popular but can be dangerous. If you are sent an e-card be very cautious of opening it even if you do know the sender. Before opening the e-card, emailyour friend and ask if they sent it to you and iff they did not then delete the message immediatelyand empty the trash on your computer. Viruses attached to the e-card mayhave a timer and self open in your trash at a later date and invade yourcomputer and get information that is private. Install anti-virus protection onyour phone as well as your regular computer. McAfee and Norton have good anti-virus programs.

Christy also encouraged us to be on thelook out for sound alike names of charities for year end giving. Names like theInternational Rotary Foundation instead of the Rotary International Foundationetc. are strategies used to mislead charitable donors. 

Christy also gave our group some tips regarding passwords. Short passwords as well as petnames, children's names and birthdays are common and easy for thieves to guess. The longer the password theharder for thieves to decode and copy. The use upper and lower case letters,numbers and symbols are all strategies to make your password safer. A goodexample would be: My!passWoRd-32". She encouraged us not to use passwordswhen we are on public free wifi and internet. At restaurants and Starbucks, ifyou use your password, thieves may be hanging around just waiting to snatch it.There is even a thing called a WarDriver who can drive by your house and get on your unsecured wifi and get in toyour computer and copy your keystrokes to see what your passwords are. Sheadvised us all to password protect our personal wifi even in ourhouses.

Medical identity theft is also a boomingbusiness. Someone accesses your Social Security number, address, mother'smaiden name etc. through a variety of calls or contest entries or your Facebookpage, and then they use your healthinsurance to get procedures done for themselves at your expense. The Hippaprivacy laws protect our medical information, but once they steal it, it alsoprotects the crook from being caught. You are the only one who can check your medical records to confirm that they only contain information regarding your health. A criminal's badhealth information could haunt you.

While this presentation was scary to think about, it was alsoempowering. If you would like more information about thesubject, you can contact Christy at the Greeley police station. Thanks for yourgood advice, Christy and for all the good work you do putting bad guys awaythrough your investigations.

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Posted by Kacie Vaughn

Here are the photos, courtesy of Doug Lidiak, from the Greeley Lights the Night Parade in downtown Greeley. 

http://www.lidiakphotography.com/Rotary/Greeley-Lights-The-Night-2013

Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

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Seventeen year old, Amanda Cory has been making her mark ever since she got to high school.  As a freshman, she reached out to her newly-hired school counselor to make her  feel welcome at Northridge High School.  She even wrote a consoling note when the counselor's brother died and a congratulatory note when her counselor had a baby.  

Amanda is an articulate and active young woman.  She recently planned a food and clothing drive following the Greeley-Evans floods.  She is the Interact president, plays four sports, is involved in student council and many school activities as well as the school board.  Amanda was a Young Rotary Youth Leadership Award (RYLA) participant and a high school RYLA participant.

She shared with us a parable of the Coffee Bean which she uses to guide her life.  Many things when surrounded by "hot water" or difficult circumstances, become weighted down and made soggy by their environment.  She chooses to be more like the coffee bean which changes its environment.  She wants to change her environment when it becomes difficult and like good coffee, not become bitter.

Amanda has applied to nine Universities and hopes to study English and writing.  Good luck in the future to a truly amazing student and person.

Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

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Harper Reed is a graduate of Central High School in Greeley.  He is also the former Chief Information Officer for the Obama Campaign.  He and his team paid attention to how the social media works and designed a system and interaction with social media to use it to great advantage in the Obama Campaign. He has apparently always been an 'out of the box' thinker and personality.  In High School he was Student body President in both his junior and senior years at Central High.  According to  Rotarians who knew him then, he also had dyed red hair.  After graduating from college in Iowa, he went on to several successful ventures in the computer coding world.  

In and entertaining and informative way, Harper led those of us who are technically challenged through the world of coding and customer experience.  The focus of his outcomes for the campaign were end user experience and end goals for the campaign.  His team was able to observe and interact with supporter behavior in a way that captured enthusiasm, friendship, and political activism.  Like Rotary, they leveraged friends talking to and asking for assistance from friends.  

When asked why his company was not asked to roll out the Obama Healthcare package, he replied that it would smack of cronyism which was an unacceptable option.  He helped us to grasp the enormity of the task of trying to coordinate a computer roll out of a plan that effects 50 states with different rules and numerous insurance companies who also have different rules and state constraints.  He also pointed to the fact that securing a government contract is a difficult hurdle for many companies and they often pour more resources into contract procurement than into contract execution.

Harper is and interesting and impressive human being with a lot to offer the world.  He currently lives in Chicago with his family.  He can be reached at Harper@modest.com.  I hope that someone in Chicago offers him the opportunity to become a Rotarian.  He could be a very creative addition to any organization.

Posted by Kacie Vaughn

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Harper Sheets - Greeley West High School
Posted by Kacie Vaughn

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Daniel Mork - Greeley West High School
Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

Tom Fyffe, Senior Estimator, and Ryan Martorano, Chief Estimator presented thehistory and plans for Hensel Phelps Construction.  Hensel Phelps Construction was started in 1937 foundedby Hensel Phelps. The first project was Hensel's parents' house. From those modestbeginnings, it has grown to a company of over 2000 employees and an annualrevenue of over 3 Billion dollars. They have grown to be internationallyrecognized as an honest and reliable construction company. They have builtthe Denver Convention Center, Ocean Journey, The wooden roller coaster at ElitchGardens, The Justice Center, The Tabor Center, Vestas Manufacturing Co., TheMiami, Orlando and San Francisco airports as well as many other well knownbuildings. They contributed their profit and overhead costs to the building ofour own homeless shelter, The Guadalupe Center.
Their national reputation wasacknowledged immediately following the 9/11 attacks on the Pentago and the U.S. government asked Hensel Phelps to take on the 10 year, rebuild and remodel project. They finished in less than 9years and were under budget. They are continuing to focus on above groundconstruction projects. They do some international projects, but only if thereis staff that wants to be relocated for several years of theproject.

Thanks to Tom and Ryan for sharing a story of honesty and Rotaryvalues of Service Above Self. 

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Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

Officer Morgan May is the Supervisor of 30 officers responsible for the Sheriffdepartment detention center. He also champions the Special Olympics program inthe area.
It was an emotional moment for officer May to receive the award nownamed for fallen officer Sam Brownlee. Officer May was a classmate and friendof Sam Brownlee in the academy.
Mrs. May was also honored with a bouquet offlowers as a thank you for her support of her husband who daily puts himself inharms way to keep Greeley safe. They were both honored and touched by today'spresentations. Our gratitude to them and to all who serve.

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Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

Courtney was introduced by her counselor from Greeley West as one of the top twostudents she has ever worked with. Courtney is the current student bodypresident of Greeley West. She is a previous Rotary Youth Leadership Awardrecipient. She sang the praises of RYLA and her experience there. She isgrateful for the skills and inspiration she received. She shared that shelearned that if we are all willing to push pebbles together, we can movemountains! She is very active in a variety of service clubs and projects. Sheis in the Baccalaureate academic program and active with her church. She runscross country and loves hiking and reading. She plans to attend UC Denver and major in international relations.

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Posted by Kacie Vaughn

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Check out the great pictures from the Reverse Raffle!  A big thank you to Doug Lidiak for taking such wonderful photos!

http://www.lidiakphotography.com/Rotary/Reverse-Raffle-2013

Posted by Kacie Vaughn

The Nominating Committee is proud to propose the following members as Board of Directors for 2014-2016:  Kacie Vaughn, Michael Fitzsimmons and Blaine Breit.  This slate will be voted on during our annual meeting on December 12, 2013.  Nominations from the floor can also be nominated at that time.

Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

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Dr. San Juana Mendoza shared her gratitude for the help she has received from our community in the past. She told us of the progress being made in Juarez, Mexico and the challenges still present.  

Dr. Mendoza is an MD who donates all of her time to serving the poorest of the poor.  She takes no salary.  She works 6 long days a week seeing patients who live at the dumpsite in Juarez, Mexico.  She does primary care, health education, and encourages her people to seek more education to improve their lives. Each morning she leaves her home in El Paso, Texas and crosses to border to her office.  She and her husband pray that she will escape the violence of the area and return home safely in the evening.

Her patients spend the day sorting through garbage looking for food, things to help them make a shelter and things they might sell to survive.  Many who are sick don't even realize the seriousness of their condition.  If they can still move, they work the dump.  One woman came in complaining that her legs might need some lotion.  In fact, she had gangrene from diabetes.  

Most of her patients are indigenous Indians from the hill country who have come to the city looking for work.  Without citizenship papers, they are denied any government health services.  They are the original citizens of Mexico.  Since they live in the mountains and do not have hospitals to record their births, they have no papers.  They make a couple of dollars per day working the dumpsite.  They can't afford medical care even if they did have papers.  Dr. Mendoza asks for 2 dollars per visit, but sees them anyway if they can not pay.

In the beginning, she used to entice the young people with candy and sweet tamales to come hear her talk about schooling and education.  Her reputation as a trusted helper has grown.  They now seek out her help because she has helped so many improve their lives through schooling. This year there are six people from the dump who have qualified to go to the university.  Some of her former students are getting degrees in engineering, biochemistry, medicine, business administration and many careers that will help them and society.

Dr. Mendoza's life is Service Above Self.  Our major service project for the year is to raise money to help buy the daily supplies and medicines she needs to do her work.  We are also facilitating the acquisition of donated equipment that might be useful in diagnosing and treating her patients on an out patient basis.  Our goal is $20,000.  We are almost there.  

Thanks to all who have supported this project by becoming sustaining members of the Greeley Centennial Foundation for $25 a year.  Thanks in advance to those who will support in other ways to help us to Engage Rotary and Change lives.

Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

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President Will Hume inducted Todd Bale into our membership.  Todd has been a member of other Rotary Clubs and is very serious about his support.  He is the current Chief Professional Officer of the Boys and Girls Club of Weld County here in Greeley.  He has a wife and seven children.  He is looking forward to being an active member of our Rotary Club.  Welcome to the Club, Todd!

Posted by Kacie Vaughn

Thanks to all of the Rotarians that came out last week and toured the west Greeley emergency room. 

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Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

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One of Greeley's renowned educators presented an informational talk on the impacts of Amendment 66 for District 6 schools.  Dr. Broderius shared some background on the state's current school funding plan and how it has basically deprived District 6 of its fair share over the past 15 years.  By repurposing some of the money already in the State budget for education, and by raising taxes just a little, District 6 will begin to make up for the past deprivations.

The system will be more fair and the money raised by the tax will be protected from being used for anything other than the education of students.  District 6 will gain over 27 million dollars/year toward educational resources for our students.  Because the new system makes up for past slights, every $1 of tax we spend will net us $3.  That is a great investment in the future of our children and our community.  People like to live and work in communities that take the best care of the education of their children.

Damion LeeNatalli shared a perspective on our current contributions to education.  When he was in school, citizens paid 10% of their income to fund education.  We currently only spend 8%.  After the tax increase from amendment 66, we will only be up to 8.2%.  

District Superintendent, Ranelle Lang, shared that we have students in our district with extra challenges.  There are 53 different languages of origin for the students in our district.  We need to help  them all learn English as well as keep them from falling behind while they learn.  All children deserve the chance to succeed.  We all benefit when they do. 

We were also given a handout with Frequently Asked Questions as well as a breakdown of the facts and ways the 27 million dollars will be allocated.  If you want that information for yourself, go to www.coloradocommitstokids.com or www.greeleyschools.org and click on Ballot Amendment 66.

A big thanks to our own Doug Lidiak for bringing us this timely program.

 

Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

Jacob Ouma shares the joys andchallenges of rescuing girls from brutal, illegal practices inKenya

Mark Hagen of the Red Eye Rotary inGreeley, Thanked our Club for participating in a water project that broughtfresh, clean water to the Kenya Girls Rescue Center.

Then he went on to introduce ourspeaker, Jacob Auma, from Kenya, who is the Director of the Rescue Center whichruns the Kenya Olooloitikkoshi ( Ulu loi tik koshi) Project.

 The Olooloitikkoshi Project is a GirlsRescue Center (GRC) in Massailand, Kenya, that was built to address early forcedmarriages and the tragic practice of Female Genital Mutilation ( FGM). Thesecommon practices, occurring in large numbers in tribal Africa, continue toinflict pain, humiliation, and poverty on young women.

Massai girls in Kenya have less worthto their fathers than cattle or goats. A Massai man's wealth is determined bythe number of cattle and goats he possesses. He can acquire more livestock by"Selling" his young daughter into marriage to an older man. These marriagesare usually polygamous, and the young girl (sometimes as young as 8 years old)becomes a slave to her husband and to his older wives. She must quit school.Beatings are common and child sexual abuse is considered a right and normalsexual practice. Since girls are considered purchased property, their lives areat risk for disobedience and attempted escape. All hope of a different futurefor the girl is lost.

Jacob Auma, described the FemaleGenital Mutilation tradition and process to us in a modest, but heart wrenchingway. No anesthesia nor medical attention is offered to these young girls. Theplight of these girls and the need for rescue was clear.

Jacob and the Rescue Center become thesource of respect and humanitarian treatment for these rescued young girls.They are given food, shelter, school fees, clothing, transportation, andmedical care. Most importantly, they are given hope for their futures as freeeducated women.

There are currently 39 young girlsbeing housed and cared for buy the Rescue Center. The Center can accommodate upto 100 girls as funds become available through donations. The project wasstarted through Christ Community Church here in Greeley. Funding is run througha 501c3 called Network Beyond, (www.networkbeyond.org), P.O. Box 337626 Greeley,CO 80633. Donations are always welcome.

There are so many ways to EngageRotary and Change Lives. This project, and our awareness of it, offersanother one.

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Posted by Loren Wright

Hope Cassidy introduced our guest speaker this week who was Jim Dougherty who is a retired school counselor. Jim and his wife have dedicated much of their time during retirement to working on schools, water, and latrine projects in Honduras. Money contributed by our club helped fund a portion of Jim's latest project which was the construction of a school in a small village named Union Cedral Honduras. Union Cedral is a rural mountain village located about 20 miles from a larger city named Copan.

The project to build a school in Union Cedral became a priority because the village was currently using two very small buildings to accommodate nearly 120 students. Construction supplies and materials were very difficult to come by and transport because the roads leading to Union Cedral from Copan are built through very rugged terrain making the trip take nearly 2 hours normally and impassable most of the time in the rainy season. The funding from this project came from a coordinated joint effort from Centennial Rotary and Simple Suppers For Kids. Centennial Rotary provided funding for everything that would go inside of the school including desks and school supplies as well as efforts to restore an outdoor bathroom. Simple Suppers For Kids provided funding to construct the building and outer walls. Most of the labor came at no cost because many of the locals were happy to help considering the benefit it would be to their small community. Thanks to the coordinated efforts of Simple Suppers, Greeley Rotary, Jim's family, and many of the local farmers, the students of Union Cedral not only have a clean and sturdy place to meet but many school supplies to aid in their education.

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Posted by Loren Wright

Pin Drawing winner this week was Will Hume who was not present so the drawing goes to $20 next week.

50/50 winner this week was Alexia Peake.

Posted by Kacie Vaughn

The Golf Tournament was a success and Carroll Miller with Ticket 664 was the lucky winner of the golf ball drop prize of $1500!  Click the link below for photos of the tournament courtesy of Doug Lidiak.  Glen Droegemueller will have a full financial update for us at this Thursday's meeting. 

http://www.lidiakphotography.com/Rotary/Golf-Tournament-2013

 

 

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Posted by Loren Wright

Mitch Daily and Chance Kanode from the state Future Farmer's of America were our speakers for the last meeting and they explained to us a little more about FFA and also shared some experiences they had on a recent trip to Japan. FFA actually holds the largest convention in the United States on an annual basis with nearly 54,000 attendees. The national convention is so large that they actually televise the presentations because of the vast influence that FFA has across the country.

Mitch and Chance had the pleasure of visiting Japan where they were able to learn more about the farming techniques used in Japan and also share U.S. farming techniques with Japanese students. The primary difference between farming in the U.S. and farming in Japan is the amount of space available. The average farm size in Japan is 5 acres where the U.S. is over 400 acres. Japanese farmers have learned to adapt to these small spaces and are able to efficiently use every small space available to plant and most have incorporated greenhouses into their farms. Some farmers in Japan have very small tractors but most prefer to hire laborers to use hand planters to plant their crops. Needless to say they were surprised at the amount of time it would take our equipment to accomplish the same task.

Even though the farms are much smaller in Japan, farmers are still able to make a pretty good living because of the high demand for their products. The average Japanese wage earner spends 30% of their annual income on food. Since there is such a small supply of domestic food production and such a dense population the price of home-grown food products is very high. Mitch and Chance showed our group pictures that included a case of 5 oranges that would cost $99 and a relatively small fish that would sell for around $2000. Super-markets carry less expensive product that is imported including some beef but food is still a very large expense even to the Japanese middle class.

Mitch Daily and Chance Kanode have both taken time out of their college career to fulfill their duties with state FFA but both plan to return to college and go into some kind of agricultural field. We appreciate their vast knowledge of the subject and thank them for taking the time to present to us.

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Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

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Yolanda from San Andreas, Guatemala came to speak to us and thank us for supporting Starfish One By One.  Yolanda is one of the Starfish program graduates from the first class which started five years ago. She was accompanied by Darcy Struckoff, energetic director of development for Starfish who has helped organize the trip that 13 of our members will take to Guatemala in November to visit the Starfish site.  

Yolanda spoke to us about her experience as a graduate of the Starfish program.  Starfish has a three tiered program which involves identifying bright, but underprivileged Mayan girls.  The girls are enveloped into a program involving academic scholarships, mentorships and internships.  The girls and their families are "almost adopted" by the mentors who are themselves women who have broken the cycle of poverty and become empowered women.  The girls are guided, encouraged, coached and supported in many ways to nurture their eventual success.  95% of the girls in the program finish their education.  Throughout Guatemala only 5% of girls finish primary school most only finishing 2 years of school.

Yolanda was one of a group of 12 girls.  They picked a name for their group which was "United for a Dream".  Yolanda finished her High School and began University in January.  She speaks a Guatemalan dialect as well as is fluent in Spanish.  She came to Lakewood, Colorado to study and improve her English.  She wants to start a travel business in Guatemala helping tourists find the best places to shop and stay while they travel and learn the customs and traditions of Guatemala and the Mayan people.  She also hopes to employ others to help with the overall economy.

Our club was one of the sponsoring clubs for a Global Matching Grant through the Rotary Foundation.  We got the cooperation of 21 other clubs in and outside of our district.  Together we raised $69,000 in support of Starfish efforts in Guatemala.  The program is now five years old and quite successful.  One of their graduates is the first Mayan female city councilwoman in Guatemala.  How's that for Engaging Rotary and Changing Lives!!!

Darcy translated for Yolanda and also shared information about the organization of Starfish One By One.  It is run by  140 indigenous women in Guatemala and funded and supported by the efforts of the office for Starfish One By One in Evergreen Colorado.  It gets it's name from the parable of the Starfish which is an adapted and shortened version of The Star Thrower by Loren C. Eiseley.  For a delightful, and appropriately female adaptation of the story, Google "Starfish Story" and click on the link for Ordinary People Change The World dot Com.  It's worth the effort.

We wish Yolanda and Darcy all the best as they each pursue their dreams to make a difference for people in the world.


The Starfish Story
By City Year

A young girl was walking along a beach upon which thousands of starfish had been washed up during a terrible storm. When she came to each starfish, she would pick it up, and throw it back into the ocean. People watched her with amusement.

She had been doing this for some time when a man approached her and said, “Little girl, why are you doing this? Look at this beach! You can’t save all these starfish. You can’t begin to make a difference!”

The girl seemed crushed, suddenly deflated. But after a few moments, she bent down, picked up another starfish, and hurled it as far as she could into the ocean. Then she looked up at the man and replied, “Well, I made a difference to that one!” 

The old man looked at the girl inquisitively and thought about what she had done and said. Inspired, he joined the little girl in throwing starfish back into the sea. Soon others joined, and all the starfish were saved. - adapted from the Star Thrower by Loren C. Eiseley

Perseverance against great odds and against the criticism of others is the very hallmark of value-based idealism, as is refusing to accept failure. The understanding that we hold in our hands the power to change a life, a mind, or a circumstance today – right now – is a powerful insight and motivator. At the same time, idealistic acts, even highly symbolic ones, have the power to inspire others to act, and sometimes in numbers significant enough to make a major or even complete impact on the problem at hand. Perhaps most inspiring of all is to witness the idealistic power of children and young people in action. The idealism of youth is a powerful force for leading change in the world. Often it is our youth who put into values that we have instilled in them – but have failed to act on ourselves. The world, therefore, depends on the idealism of youth to lead the way.


 

Posted by Loren Wright

Our very own Kathy Van Soest spoke with us about using our eating habits to our advantage to improve our health. One resource that Kathy directed us to is www.myplate.gov which is a site that simplifies eating healthy by showing a normal dinner plate and what your portion sizes should look like. Most Americans eat outside of the recommended portions and in most cases eat more than they should. Even though protein is an essential part to a healthy diet, most Americans eat more protein than they should and usually don't eat enough fish which is recommended twice a week. The recommended salt intake is 1 teaspoon or 2500mg per day for most people and as little as 1500mg for people age 51 and older or with high blood pressure and/or cholesterol. A majority of Americans consume nearly 5000mg or double the recommended intake each day. Kathy is very educated on eating healthy and is a great resource to have in our club.

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Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

Greg Anton gave a well informed, understandable, and confronting report about the state of the Nation's financial statement. One illustration was that the total net worth of everyone in the United States, including all the wealthiest people, was still less than the total national debt when you include all of the pension obligations of the government.  He has been very active trying to educate our lawmakers to the actual size of this problem.  He has a website where he has posted the video that was used to inform Freshmen Congressmen during their orientation.  He asked us to share the link with everyone so that we could all get a business perspective on what is at stake when we consider our country as a business.  The website is:  www.AIPPA.org/whatisatstake.  His presentation was alarming and informative.  I am sure that his video will be an educational experience for everyone.  His presentation certainly was.

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Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

Police Chief Gates introduced Elizabeth Finch as this months recipient of the Service Above Self Award.  Elizabeth serves our community as a Child Abuse and Child Sexual Abuse Investigator.  Some of her techniques and protocols have been adopted as models for training other Child Abuse investigators in the department and in text books.  She feels she is working for the child more than working for the department and that motivates her to continue to do excellent investigations.  Her husband, Todd Finch, was a Service Above Self recipient in the past.  Today he received a bouquet of candy as our thanks for being a supportive spouse for Elizabeth's demanding work.  Thank you, Elizabeth, for your extra effort  on behalf of the children of our community

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Posted by Loren Wright

Doug Lidiak introduced Nancy Devine who is the Chief Academic Officer for District 6. Nancy went through the complex system of teaching children to read. She explained that teaching children to read is not as easy as putting a good book in their hands. The system District 6 is very calculated and is built to help each child learn at the pace that fits them best.

The foundation of the system used is a benchmark that measures the children's reading level and comparing it to normal children in that grade. After evaluation of each child's progress they evaluate the best way to either help a child catch up to where they should be or pushing children to go above and beyond what is expected of them but having a common schedule for all students. Nancy discussed the 5 big ideas of reading which are; phonemic awareness, phonic, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. These 5 things are what our teachers measure for each child to evaluate their reading level.

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Posted by Loren Wright

We were fortunate to have a number of the UNC Athletic coaching staff join us and give a candid outlook on what their seasons may have in store for the coming year.

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-Jenny Shoop who is Director of Development introduced the guest coaches but also informed us of some important upcoming dates at UNC including Homecoming which is September 28th

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-Tim Barrera is the women's soccer coach for the Bears and is starting his 15th season with UNC. Tim mentioned that the Best Wester in Loveland has sponsored the women's soccer season so all home games are free admission to the general public .

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- Amanda Schick is starting her 3rd year as head coach for both Cross Country and Track & Field.

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-Lyndsey Oates is working on her 11th season as the UNC Volleyball coach. Lyndsey is also expecting a baby boy who is due in the middle of the Volleyball season.

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-Earnest Collins is just starting his 3rd season as the Bear's head Football coach. Bear's football will be hosting 7 home games this season.

 

Posted by Kacie Vaughn

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Our service above self award was presented to Rick Smith with the Greeley Fire Department this month.  Rick has been with the department for 15 years and is a forest fire paramedic.  An amazing story was shared by one of Rick’s colleagues, Jeff Odell, about how Rick saved a fellow firefighter’s life back in June.  The firefighter suffered a heart attack while fighting a forest fire in Rocky Mountain National Park.  Rick happened to be in the same area when the call came in and saved the man’s life by acting so quickly and efficiently.  Rick’s wife, Jennifer, also attended the meeting last week when Rick was recognized by our club.  Thank you to Rick and Jennifer for their sacrifice and dedication to our community.

Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

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“I lost my Mom two months before RYLA. I was empty. I had lost my spark. RYLA was an amazing experience for me. Thanks to RYLA, I started to fill the emptiness and I found my spark. Thank you.” Jordan Wagner Frontier Academy High School

“ It was amazing how quickly my team became a family. I hope to continue my experience and become a Junior Counselor next year and help give to others what was given to me. Thank you for the experience of a lifetime.” Daniel Buhler University High School

“ At first I felt shy. After 2-3 days of team building, I felt a lot of trust for everyone on my team.” Hunter Larson University Middle School

‘RYLA was one of the most meaningful experiences of my life. I want to do more for my community. I learned a lot about trust.” Caitlyn Olsen Frontier Academy Middle School

“My friends who went to RYLA before me all came back enthusiastic and obsessed with helping out. I thought I might debunk the RYLA experience and find the faults by participating. They were not kidding about the RYLA magic! I gained a lot of confidence and learned a lot about leadership skills. Thank you.” Lucas Smith Frontier Academy High School

I felt reserved at first, but after experiencing the Trust Falls with my team I felt connected. My grandma died the Tuesday of the conference. My mom came down to tell me in person and let me choose to stay or go. I chose to stay and finish the experience with my team. I kept my loss to myself because I wanted them to like me for me and not out of sympathy. On Friday I told my team and they were wonderful.”
Sara Hume University High School

“ I learned how strong people are and that I am not alone. I learned that if it is to be it is up to me.” Tori Palmer Frontier Academy High School

“Before RYLA I thought I knew a lot about leadership. At RYLA I got to know a lot of people in a short time. Addison Vergara Greeley West High School

“I am almost an Eagle Scout. I think I learned more about leadership in one week at RYLA than in all the time I have been in Boy Scouts.” Ian Spooner Eaton High School

“RYLA has changed my life. I feel like the teenage blinders I had been used to having have been removed. I see everything, every person and every story now. I love without trusting prejudices or stereotypes. I am open to letting myself feel how others have felt. I also have a whole new family that I feel like I have known my whole life. I miss everyone s if we were a high school off for the summer. But please send more people! I want to share my experience with everyone I can.” Kenzie Montano : email sent to Keith Abbot

The Rotary Youth Leadership Awards recipients for Junior High and High School shared their experiences and gratitude with us at our meeting on Thursday Aug. 8th. There were three students who attended young RYLA leadership training conference at the Ponderosa Conference grounds in Larkspur, Colorado and six students who went to the high school RYLA conference at the YMCA conference grounds in Estes Park.
From Sunday afternoon until Friday at noon these young people were immersed in leadership training activities. Team building games and exercises, self-awareness and other awareness increasing events, inspiring presentations by guest speakers, touching presentations by their peer counselors, and opportunities to debrief all of their experiences with a small group of 12-13 fellow participants who were part of their team throughout the conference. Each team had a Junior Counselor and a Senior Counselor. Junior Counselors are selected through a highly competitive process from former RYLA participants. Senior Counselors are Rotarians who apply and go through background checks and are then selected by the RYLA Board of Directors.

A BIG THANK YOU to all of the RYLA students for giving us such an uplifting and touching program.
Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

ImageThe second half of our Rotary program was a visit from Amelia Earhart.  She shared stories about her life and the value of having supportive parents when you want to push boundaries and explore new horizons.  Elsa Wolff, part of the High Plains Chautauqua, did a wonderful portrayal of Amelia Earhart.  She was the first person to fly from Hawaii to Oakland, California.  She inspired women of her day and people of all ages.  As part of her program, she spoke directly to the RYLA students who were present at our meeting.  She was inspiring, encouraging and motivational as well as historical.  What an amazing event to have this woman reach out of the past and touch the lives of the eight young leaders we were honoring that day.  Thank you Elsa and Amelia for invigorating both young and old with your presentation.
Posted by Kacie Vaughn

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Support Greeley Colorado Mission of Mercy (COMOM) 2013

Where: Island Grove Event Center
When:  October 4th & 5th, 2013

To Volunteer or Donate Call: Ken Knutson 970-371-1089 or Joel Feinberg 970-396-1921

For More Information visit www.COMOM.org

Volunteer Types:

Manpower to help set up and take down for the event

Assist with parking for volunteers and patients on Oct 4th and 5th

Patient movement and crowd control during the event

Data entry at the event

Assistance with food serving for volunteers and patients

Pre-Event copying of paperwork

Patient registration and exit interviews

In-Kind Donations:

Use of 2 copying machines during the event (drop off Oct 3rd and pick up on Oct 6th) legal size capability

Use of 2 large compressors (175-195 CFM)

Printing of volunteer certificates

Printing of volunteer name tags

Food for volunteers

Snacks for patients to include small fruit and pudding cups, soft nutrition bars and soft non-refrigerated food

300 gallons of distilled water to run the autoclaves

Colored t-shirts for volunteers (1000)

Germicidal wipes and anti-microbial gels

Donations:

Monetary donations

 

Posted by Kacie Vaughn

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This month’s Service Above Self Award was presented to Officer Kevin Malovich of the Weld County Sheriff’s Office.  Officer Malovich was recognized as Officer of the Year in 2012 for the Weld County Sheriff’s Office, works in the department of corrections, is a Facility Training Officer (FTO)  and has been with the sheriff’s office for 4 years now.  A big thank you to Officer Malovich and his wife for their service and commitment to our community.

Posted by Kacie Vaughn

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Elizabeth Barber, Executive Director of The Greeley Dream Team gave us an inspiring presentation at last week’s meeting on what the Dream Team does for low income and first generational students in our school district 6.

The Greeley Dream Team is a non-profit entity supporting students in Greeley/Evans School District 6 with overcoming obstacles to succeed in school and continue on in higher education programs.  The Dream Team just celebrated their 26th year and students in their programs achieved a 98% graduation rate in 2012. 

Interesting Facts:

  • They serve over 1100 students/year in District 6
  • 700 students participate in their talent program
  • In 2012- every student in the dream team proceeded to the next grade level
  • 54 out of the 98 seniors took college credit courses.
  • Discovery program at Jefferson High School is now a graduation requirement- students learn basic life skills.  Over 70% of students passed with an 80% or better.  One of the class requirements is for the student to complete 2 community service projects.  One within Jefferson and one outside.
  • Discovery 1 program is a peer mediator program.  Students learn to be peer mediators and this program has lead to a 45% reduction in behavioral referrals at Jefferson. 
  • Child Care Program at Jefferson- served 31 teen parents and 33 children last school year

How can you help the Greeley Dream Team?

  • They are collecting 2 inch white binders for students
  • Donate to their School supplies drive
  • Sat, Aug 24th Pancake Breakfast at Applebees 8-10AM- $10/person- All You Can Eat Pancakes
  • They are always in need of volunteers at the schools
  • For more information on the Dream Team and how you can help visit: http://www.thegreeleydreamteam.org/
Posted by Kacie Vaughn

A big thank you to Past President, Fred Brown, for a fantastic Rotary year.  Congratulations to the many award recipients recognized at the President's Dinner, including our 2013 Student of the Year; Joel Knepper from Greeley West High School, Rotary Proud Award; Tom Dunn, Peace Through Service Award; Mary O'Neal, Silent Rotarian Award; Glen Droegemueller and Rotarian of the Year; Kacie Vaughn.

A big thank you to Crystal Day and the social committee for planning the dinner and to all of the current, outgoing and incoming board members for their time and dedication to the board.  We are looking forward to Will Hume’s presidency this next year and all that he has planned for our club.

Click the link below to see all of the photos from the President’s Awards Dinner courtesy of Doug Lidiak:

http://www.lidiakphotography.com/Rotary/Presidents-Award-Dinner-2013

Posted by Kacie Vaughn

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Posted by Kacie Vaughn

The June Service Above Self Award was presented to Mike Pfeiler with the Greeley Police Department.  Mike has been with GPD for 11 years.  He currently works patrol and previously served on the gang unit.  He works hard developing informants and is a huge asset to the police department.

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Posted by Kacie Vaughn

Beck Safarik, Greeley City Manager, presented the Poudre Trail Initiative to our club last Thursday.  She covered the history of the trail and how it's developed over time.  For more information on the trail and the Poudre River Trail Challenge visit poudretrail.org.

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Posted by Loren Wright

We were fortunate to hear from Jim Riesberg who is currently the Colorado State Insurance Commissioner. Earlier in his career, Jim was a middle school teacher for about 5 years but most recently served in the State House of Representatives. Jim's responsibility is to help regulate insurance companies in the State of Colorado under the Department of Regulatory Agency (DORA). Jim covers everything from property and casualty insurance to the structure that the new Affordable Care Act will require in our state. Along with the Affordable Care Act out State's recent fire situation has created a busy year for Jim and his colleagues. One tip that Jim gave us based on a majority of questions their office receives is to make sure you keep an inventory of anything with material value in your home. Jim explained that nobody knows what you own better than yourself so it cannot be the insurance companies' responsibility to cover something that you do not have record of. Jim's presentation also included a great deal of detail regarding the Affordable Care Act and specifically how it might affect us and our families.

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Posted by Edward "Ted" Gilliland

Robert Wideman spoke of his experiences as an Air Force pilot after being shot down over North Viet Nam.  He spent 6 years in the Hanoi Hilton.  He shared this experience of ejecting out of his plane and the injuries and pain of that experience and then being captured by the Viet Cong and transfered to Hanoi.  The initial torture was the worst which he described in some detail.  He said that his last three years there he was treated fairly humanely.  He also shared how hard it was on his parents to not know what was happening to him once they discovered where he was 3 mos. after his capture.  When he returned home, they had aged a lot from worrying about his safety.  It was an excellent presentation.  He went through a lot for all of us.

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Posted by Loren Wright

The Centennial Rotary Club has worked over the years with Dr Mendoza on several projects.   She is a clinical physician taking care of the “dump” people in Juarez Mexico.  She lives in El Paso TX but travels daily to her clinic in Juarez, despite the drug wars that have plagued the area for years.

 

Dr Mendoza will be in Greeley for the Simple Supper program the evening of February 19, and all are invited to attend that no cost soup supper and hear her story.

 

Centennial Rotary World Community Service committee will host her at 7:00 AM on the 19th at Hope Therapy and Pool Center located at 2780 28th Ave. All who are interested in visiting with this wonderful humanitarian and would like the opportunity to directly interact with her, are invited to attend. Enter the Hope Center via the north door and precede upstairs to the boardroom.

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Welcome to Greeley Centennial Rotary!

Service Above Self

We meet Thursdays from 12:00 Noon until 1:15 PM

Greeley Country Club

4500 W 10th St
Greeley, CO 80634
United States

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Directors
President Will Hume
President Elect Brenda Dones
Treasurer Dianne Spencer
Secretary Jonathan Seitz
Past President Fred Brown
Board Member Mary O'Neal
Board Member Mike Oakes
Board Member Romia Pritchett
Board Member "Ted" Gilliland
Board Member Dennis Oberhelman
Board Member Joe LaPorta
Board Member Lori Annand
Board Member Kathy Van Soest
Board Member Judy Hicks
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